CLANCHY FROM MEMORY TO WRITTEN RECORD PDF

Start your review of From Memory to Written Record: England - Write a review Shelves: 20th-century , british-isles , medieval-history This was a book that changed my thinking. Luckily the author also has conveniently written England and its Rulers that could serve as a general introduction to the period. From Memory to Written Record is an exploration of the shift in culture during that part of the middle ages in England from a reliance on memory to an increasing use of written records. It This was a book that changed my thinking. It takes in language ie languages of record and writing as opposed to spoken languages , the court system, government and administration.

Author:Zulkigrel Mikabar
Country:Solomon Islands
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Music
Published (Last):9 September 2004
Pages:451
PDF File Size:17.5 Mb
ePub File Size:11.75 Mb
ISBN:182-5-76422-217-3
Downloads:13811
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Nizuru



Start your review of From Memory to Written Record Write a review Shelves: 20th-century , british-isles , medieval-history This was a book that changed my thinking. Luckily the author also has conveniently written England and its Rulers that could serve as a general introduction to the period.

From Memory to Written Record is an exploration of the shift in culture during that part of the middle ages in England from a reliance on memory to an increasing use of written records. It This was a book that changed my thinking. It takes in language ie languages of record and writing as opposed to spoken languages , the court system, government and administration. The details about the technical side of writing are also fascinating, the preparation of writing materials the scraping of vellum, the stitching of threads across the page to act as guidelines , how books were written, the spread of the use of seals and of course forgeries.

The first is that the shift in patterns of thinking obliged or made forgery attractive. By the end of the period for instance grants of property were invariably written down and recorded, just as they would be today - this was not however true of earlier times.

To the pre-literate mind, Clanchy argues the written record was not required. The important point was the witnessing of the act of transfer which might be symbolised by the transfer of an object from the giver to the receiver - this might be symbolically or literally re-enacted for example when rent was paid, a tradition that survives in some peppercorn rent situations. This left the owner in later times in the increasingly awkward position of not being able to document their ownership of property.

The only logical course of action in the face of the change of mentalities was forgery and as a result a good half of the known charters attributed to Edward the Confessor are forgeries. The other point is about data recall and capture. The practise of forging Papal documents was not unknown - but the medieval Papacy had no bureaucratic means of assessing the authenticity of any document that purported to be a genuine Papal Bull.

Each document had to be assessed and judged to see if it appeared to be genuine. And if it appeared to be sufficiently genuine it could be accepted as such. There was no means, or it simply did not occur to anybody to maintain or check against a register of issued documents.

Instead the apparently distinctive but forgable lead seal or Bulla hence papal Bull in English would be scrutinised along with the Latin used - the Papal chancellery developed an ornate and baroque literary style in an attempt to to make the almost incomprehensible language a mark of authenticity!

The other side of literacy is then bureaucracy - the recoverability and accessibility of written records. This leads to things that we accept as entirely natural but which at one time were exciting innovations - like alphabetical listings. Finding something in it would have been a labour of love, or extreme frustration. For instance his use of the in any case fascinating Chronicle of the Abbey of Bury St Edmunds to look at issues of languages and literacy.

Nor was this an issue restricted to Wales, as Clanchy makes clear this was a basic fact of English life. The social elite spoke French, the third estate spoke English, or Welsh, or Flemish, but the language of record was invariably Latin.

Possibly at several removes for example from English to French to Latin. England was a slightly unusual case as an English literate culture had existed prior to , this was not the case for much of Europe where Latin dominated. Although as far as can be told from the last surviving versions of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle the literary Old English based on a West Saxon dialect seems to have been diverging from other varieties of English by the end of the Saxon period.

With the conquest some of this heritage was junked. What we now know as The Exeter Book of Riddles was broken up and used as the binding for a later Latin text and only rediscovered when the book was taken apart for restoration.

AUTOMATYKA ZABEZPIECZENIOWA PDF

From Memory to Written Record: England 1066 - 1307, 3rd Edition

.

SONOANATOMY FOR ANAESTHETISTS PDF

From Memory to Written Record

.

GOSPEL OF BARNABAS MALAYALAM PDF

From Memory to Written Record: England 1066 - 1307

.

Related Articles