FIRE IN THE ASHES KOZOL PDF

Add to Cart About Fire in the Ashes In this powerful and culminating work about a group of inner-city children he has known for many years, Jonathan Kozol returns to the scene of his previous prize-winning books, and to the children he has vividly portrayed, to share with us their fascinating journeys and unexpected victories as they grow into adulthood. For nearly fifty years, Jonathan has pricked the conscience of his readers by laying bare the savage inequalities inflicted upon children for no reason but the accident of being born to poverty within a wealthy nation. But never has his intimate acquaintance with his subjects been more apparent, or more stirring, than in Fire in the Ashes, as Jonathan tells the stories of young men and women who have come of age in one of the most destitute communities of the United States. Some of them never do recover from the battering they undergo in their early years, but many more battle back with fierce and often jubilant determination to overcome the formidable obstacles they face. As we watch these glorious children grow into the fullness of a healthy and contributive maturity, they ignite a flame of hope, not only for themselves but also for our society. About Fire in the Ashes In this powerful and culminating work about a group of inner-city children he has known for many years, Jonathan Kozol returns to the scene of his prize-winning books Rachel and Her Children and Amazing Grace, and to the children he has vividly portrayed, to share with us their fascinating journeys and unexpected victories as they grow into adulthood.

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Shelves: arc , nonfiction True equality means equal opportunities and safety for all, and a book like this is a bit unique in that it doesnt just look at inequalities but also examines the long-term effects of attempts at intervening and helping people who basically got the short end of the stick.

Kozol succeeds quite well in analyzing what has worked and what hasnt in the Bronx where a large part of his social justice career has been. The chapters each focus on a different child, although a couple of children get their own chapters. There are a few things that are immediately apparent from observing the long-term trajectory of these kids, which is why a book like this is so valuable for social justice work.

First, all of the kids who were homeless or who spent a long time in homeless shelters had many more problems and difficulties later in life. It is clear that homelessness has a long-lasting negative impact on children, no matter how many good opportunities come to them later in life. Similarly, girls seem to stand a better chance than boys of climbing out of the poverty they grew up in. Kozol never makes any clear speculative statements as to why he thinks this is, but the multiple lives we observe clearly demonstrate that boys are more targeted than girls both by the crime lords and by the police.

The other big theme of the book is of course how educational inequality entrenches classism and racism. One thing that stood out to me was how quickly kids are lost if they never get a firmly established literacy and sense of confidence in their ability to learn.

Once kids start getting held back a grade or fall below grade level, it is incredibly easy to become discouraged and turn to what appears to be an easier life of crime. Kozol ends the book by talking about what he sees as progress and how the now grown-up kids he worked with see possible solutions.

He views any child whose life ultimately is one of peace and self-worth as an accomplishment, whether they even completed high school or not.

That the inequality is so deeply entrenched that we must truly rock the system and not just save one child at a time. She does ultimately agree that the small changes are still worthy of praise and is working on a degree in sociology so she may go back to the Bronx and focus in on small changes. That then is the question at the heart of this book and one for which there are no easy answers.

How do we fix this problem? I think perhaps that it will appeal most to anyone whose day to day job involves having small influences on the education of individuals. Overall then I recommend this to those who work in education whether formally or informally. It is encouraging to see the perspective of an older person who has clearly seen how his life work has impacted the kids he worked with. Check out my full review. Note: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

We follow the lives of a few people from the Bronx in New York City. Some overcome the poverty, the poor education, and the crime and drug culture to rise up and above. We also see some, who sadly, do not make it. They are the victims of both themselves and their harsh living environment. In this predatory environment it is easy for the government to This is truly an inspirational book which confirms, that by helping one, this can radiate to many; having a long term beneficial effect for all.

In this predatory environment it is easy for the government to avoid improving the schools and housing, cleaning the streets of drug dealers. The people in the Bronx are marginalized by their race, their poverty and their illiteracy. The author provides us with a view of the streets and schools of the Bronx that would be unacceptable to the wealthier denizens of Manhattan who have the means and power to improve their living standards.

For instance, the affluent would never accept an unqualified teacher for their children.

ARNHEIM VISUAL THINKING PDF

Fire in the Ashes

Shelves: arc , nonfiction True equality means equal opportunities and safety for all, and a book like this is a bit unique in that it doesnt just look at inequalities but also examines the long-term effects of attempts at intervening and helping people who basically got the short end of the stick. Kozol succeeds quite well in analyzing what has worked and what hasnt in the Bronx where a large part of his social justice career has been. The chapters each focus on a different child, although a couple of children get their own chapters. There are a few things that are immediately apparent from observing the long-term trajectory of these kids, which is why a book like this is so valuable for social justice work. First, all of the kids who were homeless or who spent a long time in homeless shelters had many more problems and difficulties later in life. It is clear that homelessness has a long-lasting negative impact on children, no matter how many good opportunities come to them later in life. Similarly, girls seem to stand a better chance than boys of climbing out of the poverty they grew up in.

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Fire in the Ashes: Twenty-Five Years Among the Poorest Children in America

There are few triumphs in the bleak landscapes Kozol visits. Advertisement Kozol has an obvious gift for friendship, and a willingness to help in practical ways when he believes a child will leverage an opportunity into a better future. On numerous occasions, Kozol steps in and helps a promising student from the South Bronx get a scholarship to a good high school or college, calling headmasters, wealthy donors, or philanthropic organizations. Most of all, Kozol stays in touch with these families, making innumerable phone calls, visits, and simply acting as a positive influence in the lives of these children. Instead, Kozol shows us the very real costs of putting children in bad schools where they receive low-quality educations and then return to communities, like the South Bronx, where economic opportunity is woefully lacking and where criminality becomes the path for more than a few of the young people Kozol encounters.

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