GEOFFREY BLAINEY THE CAUSES OF WAR PDF

He breaks down a number of factors which not only create wars, but also create peace as well. Personally, I think that the measures he identifies as causes are more accurately described as enablers or perhaps deterrents for both war and peace. Blainey correctly states that wars and peace are causally linked. His view is couched in realpolitik. To this end, he sees morality, especially on the international stage, as a nonentity.

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Blainey was born in Melbourne and raised in a succession of Victorian country towns before attending Wesley College and the University of Melbourne. After graduating, Blainey took a freelance writing assignment and travelled to the Mount Lyell mining field in Tasmania to research and write the history of the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company , at Queenstown. In the s, many older residents could remember the beginnings of the community. The resultant book, The Peaks of Lyell , achieved six editions.

His works have ranged from sports and local histories to interpreting the motives behind the British settlement of Australia in The Tyranny of Distance ; covering over two centuries of human conflict in The Causes of War ; examining the optimism and pessimism in Western society since in The Great See-Saw; Aboriginal Australia in Triumph of the Nomads and A Land Half Won ; and his exploration of the history of Christianity in A Short History of Christianity He has also written general histories of the world and the "tempestuous" 20th century.

Throughout the course of his career, Blainey has also written for newspapers and television. From to , Blainey was foundation Chancellor of the University of Ballarat. He served on the Council from — Blainey represented writers on the small group instructed to find the new national anthem that Whitlam had promised.

From that initiative came a public poll supporting the long-standing Australian patriotic song, " Advance Australia Fair ". In , he became an inaugural commissioner on the Australian Heritage Commission, set up by the Fraser government to decide on conservation and environmental matters.

On the first council of the National Museum set up by the Hawke Government in he was a short-term member. He was chairman of the Australia Council for four years and Chairman of the Australia-China Council from its inception in until June From to , he was the Foundation Chancellor of the University of Ballarat.

There was no opposition when his first three-year term was renewed. At the Constitutional Convention , held in Canberra for 10 days in February to debate and vote on whether Australia should become a republic and if so what kind of a republic , he was a non-elected delegate. He argued that Australia was already a "de facto republic" and that any further change should be made only if the case was very powerful.

He alleged that the pair had unduly shaped the official information posted to all electors. In their defence, it was contended that their influence was fair, for they operated in an official committee chaired by the neutral Sir Ninian Stephen , lawyer and former governor general. Later appointments included membership of the History Summit in Canberra in and the federal committee set up in to recommend a national curriculum for teaching Australian history.

In the s, s and s, he was a weekly or fortnightly columnist for The Australian , the Melbourne Herald , or the Melbourne Age ; he also wrote often for the Sydney Bulletin , the Australian Business Monthly and other national journals.

Booklets listing these articles and other works have been published by the library of Monash University. The latest booklet was last updated in about Graham Kennedy , the television star, narrated the continuity script.

In most anthologies of notable Australian speeches, present and past, one of his addresses is reprinted. He currently serves on the boards of philanthropic bodies, including the Ian Potter Foundation since and the Deafness Foundation Trust since , and is patron of others. Blainey has, at times, been a controversial figure too. In the s, he queried the level of Asian immigration to Australia and the policy of multiculturalism in speeches, articles and a book All for Australia.

As a result of these stances, Blainey is sometimes associated with right-wing politics. He regretted that the Hawke Labor Government in "a time of large unemployment" was bringing many new migrants to the areas of high unemployment, thus fostering tension. He blamed the government, not the migrants themselves. Criticising what he viewed as disproportionately high levels of Asian immigration, then running at 40 per cent of the annual intake, he added: "Rarely in the history of the modern world has a nation given such preference to a tiny ethnic minority of its population as the Australian Government has done in the past few years, making that minority the favoured majority in its immigration policy".

I do not believe that we are powerless. I do believe that we can with good will and good sense control our destiny As a people, we seem to move from extreme to extreme.

In the past 30 years the government of Australia has moved from the extreme of wanting a white Australia to the extreme of saying that we will have an Asian Australia and that the quicker we move towards it the better".

He argued: "We are surrendering much of our own independence to a phantom opinion that floats vaguely in the air and rarely exists on this earth.

We should think very carefully about the perils of converting Australia into a giant multicultural laboratory for the assumed benefit of the peoples of the world". Blainey also warned that the "crimson thread of kinship" invoked by Sir Henry Parkes was being undermined, stating: "The cult of the immigrant, the emphasis on separateness for ethnic groups, the wooing of Asia and the shunning of Britain are part of this thread-cutting.

In contrast, while Blainey was briefly in Europe in May, a professor and 23 other history teachers from the University of Melbourne distributed a public letter distancing themselves from what they called his "racialist" views. After a crowd of left-wing students and marchers, mostly from outside the University of Melbourne, broke into the heavily guarded building where Blainey was conducting a tutorial in historical research, he was advised by the university on security grounds that it must cancel all his future addresses within the University for the rest of Blainey continued to express his views periodically on television, radio and his own newspaper columns but not in his own university.

He retained his main position as Dean of the Faculty of Arts. Subsequently, in December , the University of Melbourne granted a Doctor of Laws to Blainey [36] and declared that he was, in Australia, probably a unique professional historian, noting that he had fostered wide public interest in history. The citation observed that "few graduates of this University have exerted greater influence on national life".

Blainey and the "History Wars"[ edit ] Blainey has been an important contributor to the debate over Australian history, often referred to as the History Wars.

In his Sir John Latham Memorial Lecture, Blainey coined the phrases " Black armband view of history " versus the contrasting "three cheers" view see History wars. The phrase "Black armband view of history" began to be used, pejoratively or otherwise, by some Australian commentators and intellectuals about historians and journalists, judges and clergymen, whom they viewed as having presented an unfairly critical portrayal of Australian history since European settlement.

Former Liberal Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser described the Australian history wars as a branch of the " culture wars " and attributed Blainey with having initiated the wider wars in his immigration speeches of This patriotic view of our past had a long run. It saw Australian history as largely a success. While the convict era was a source of shame or unease, nearly everything that came after was believed to be pretty good.

There is a rival view, which I call the Black Armband view of history. In recent years it has assailed the optimistic view of history. The black armbands were quietly worn in official circles in The multicultural folk busily preached their message that until they arrived much of Australian history was a disgrace.

The past treatment of Aborigines, of Chinese, of Kanakas, of non-British migrants, of women, the very old, the very young, and the poor was singled out, sometimes legitimately, sometimes not The Black Armband view of history might well represent the swing of the pendulum from a position that had been too favourable, too self congratulatory, to an opposite extreme that is even more unreal and decidedly jaundiced.

Yet, Blainey applauded the "many distinctive merits" of the traditional Aboriginal way of life. It is still said to be the only narrative history of Aboriginal Australia before , and a pioneering work. It was listed by the National Book Council in as one of the ten most significant Australian books of the previous 10 years. In he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia for his contribution to Australian literature.

He was awarded a Companion of the Order of Australia in the Australia Day Honours list of for his service to academia, research and scholarship.

In the degree of Doctor of Letters was conferred on Professor Blainey in recognition of his contribution to the University of Ballarat and the community in general.

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The Causes of War

Maurg Account Options Sign in. Mar 10, Scott rated it it was ok. His first major project in the s was, as an author and researcher working on the history of the Mount Geoffrfy Mining and Railway Company, at Queenstown, Tasmania when a significant number of the older residents could remember the beginnings of the community. Contents The Peace that Passeth Understanding. His conclusion, as put forth in the following sentence, seems somewhat obvious to me.

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Geoffrey Blainey

Start your review of The Causes of War Write a review Jun 06, Roger rated it really liked it Recommends it for: military history buffs In this book, Geoffrey Blainey conducts a remarkably thorough investigation into the specific causes of war and offers several interesting conclusions. Blainey complains that different schools of academia often investigate the causes of war with a specific angle or hypothesis in mind and that due to this subjective viewpoint, frequently find conclusions that agree exactly with their predictions. In order to fully comprehend the causes of war, Blainey states, one must also examine the causes of In this book, Geoffrey Blainey conducts a remarkably thorough investigation into the specific causes of war and offers several interesting conclusions. In order to fully comprehend the causes of war, Blainey states, one must also examine the causes of peace. War and peace are not two separate phenomenon, but rather two parts of an ongoing cycle. Blainey calls up the work of many previous military analysts including Clausewitz, Macfie, and Henry Thomas Buckle.

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GEOFFREY BLAINEY THE CAUSES OF WAR PDF

Blainey was born in Melbourne and raised in a succession of Victorian country towns before attending Wesley College and the University of Melbourne. After graduating, Blainey took a freelance writing assignment and travelled to the Mount Lyell mining field in Tasmania to research and write the history of the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company , at Queenstown. In the s, many older residents could remember the beginnings of the community. The resultant book, The Peaks of Lyell , achieved six editions. His works have ranged from sports and local histories to interpreting the motives behind the British settlement of Australia in The Tyranny of Distance ; covering over two centuries of human conflict in The Causes of War ; examining the optimism and pessimism in Western society since in The Great See-Saw; Aboriginal Australia in Triumph of the Nomads and A Land Half Won ; and his exploration of the history of Christianity in A Short History of Christianity He has also written general histories of the world and the "tempestuous" 20th century. Throughout the course of his career, Blainey has also written for newspapers and television.

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